Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Tidal stresses and giant earthquakes
A scientist once noticed a connection between the stress that tides inflict on the planet and the number of small earthquakes that happen in some areas when that pressure is greatest. She saw a pattern to these earthquakes leading up to great tsunamis. A graduate student is now looking for a similar signal in Alaska. Yen Joe Tan of Columbia University is combing through a database of offshore Alaska earthquakes to...
Jan 28, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend
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The demise of Scotch Cap lighthouse
In spring of 1946, five men stationed at the Scotch Cap lighthouse had reasons to be happy. World War II was over. They had survived. Their lonely Coast Guard assignment on Unimak Island would be over in a few months. But the lighthouse tenders would never return to their homes in the Lower 48. In the early morning of April 1, the earth ruptured deep within the Aleutian Trench 90 miles south. An immense block of o...
Jan 21, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: 1946 tsunami survivor shares her story
On April 1, 1946, the sea floor ruptured just south of Unimak Island in the Aleutian Islands. Seawater displaced by the giant earthquake sent a 100-foot wave into the Scotch Cape lighthouse on Unimak, destroying the concrete structure and killing the five men inside. They never knew what hit them in the 2 a.m. darkness. The residents of Hilo, on Hawaii’s big island, were also unaware of the danger surging across t...
Jan 07, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Far-out science at giant gathering on Earth and space
Following a press conference at the enormous fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, an unusual sound was heard in a room of reporters: Applause. Writers and videographers representing news agencies from around the world clapped at the conclusion of a presentation by four scientists involved with the NASA mission to Mars, now in its second year. After a year of cautious data checking, ther...
Dec 31, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Far-north changes pondered in San Francisco
SAN FRANCISCO -- At this annual gathering of more than 20,000 Earth and space scientists, press conferences offered by the organizers feature scientists discussing everything from Mars rovers whiffing methane to Christmas lights visible from space. One press conference that has for a few years had a recurring slot at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union is the state of changes in the Far North. Here'...
Dec 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend
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The scoop about mastodons: Researchers were wrong
A long, long time ago, a hairy elephant stomped the northland, wrecking trees and shrubs as it fed of twigs, leaves and bark. These mastodons left a few scattered teeth and bones in Alaska and the Yukon, reminders of an animal that lived as far south as Honduras. A recent look at those far-north mastodons shows the creatures vanished from the Arctic thousands of years before earlier than researchers had thought. A...
Dec 17, 2014 | 1 1 comments | 45 45 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Alaska blackfish in a world of its own
Imagine a shallow lake north of Hughes, in the cold heart of Alaska. In frigid, sluggish water, dim blue light penetrates two feet of ice. The ice has a quarter-size hole, maintained by a stream of methane bubbles. Every few minutes, a brutish little fish swims up, sips air, and peels back to the dank. The Alaska blackfish is an evolutionary loner that fins through lakes and tundra ponds across much of the state. ...
Dec 10, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend
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Villager's remains lead to 1918 flu breakthrough
The revival of the virus responsible for the 1918 Spanish flu, the killer of millions of people, was the end of a long journey for Johan Hultin. Hultin, 90, twice retrieved samples of the virus from the lungs of flu victims preserved by permafrost in an Alaska village. Molecular pathologists used those samples to reconstruct the virus and discover that it jumped from birds to humans. Hultin visited the village of ...
Nov 26, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Northern lab cranked out the quirky and creative
"Rectal Temperature of the Working Sled Dog." "Cleaning and Sterilization of Bunny Boots." "Comparative Sweat Rates of Eskimos and Caucasians Under Controlled Conditions." These are some of the studies completed by scientists who worked for the Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory from the late 1940s to the 1960s. Developed during the Cold War to "solve the severe environmental problems of men living and working in the A...
Nov 19, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend
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Twenty weeks through the heart of Alaska
It is a very remarkable fact that a region under a civilized government for more than a century should remain so completely unknown as the vast territory drained by the Copper, Tanana and Koyukuk Rivers. So wrote Henry Allen in a government report on his muscle-powered journey from the mouth of the Copper River to the mouth of the Yukon, from where he returned by steamship to the civilized 48. Pushing on when Nati...
Nov 12, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
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