Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alaska Science Forum: Living on a glacier, thinking about rocks
CANWELL GLACIER — This summer, Sam Herreid has slept for 12 nights on these rocks that ride slowly downhill on a mass of ice. For a few days at a time during the last six summers, the 28-year-old has lived on this ephemeral landscape in the eastern Alaska Range. From his regal perch, he is learning how rock cover affects glacier melt. Sometimes, the doctoral graduate student at Northumbria University in England pa...
Sep 21, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Crane’s tricky trachea makes loud statement
UAF FARM FIELDS — Gliding in with their wings folded like paper airplanes, nine Canada geese drop their paddle feet and prepare to land in a corner of this cleared plain. On this early fall day, the birds could use an air traffic controller. Their landing zone of barley stalks is clogged with the rusty brown bodies of sandhill cranes, strutting like Mick Jagger. The geese flap in and trot to the dirt, joining the ...
Sep 07, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 36 36 recommendations | email to a friend
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Amazing Nature: Mysterious sea star wasting disease may be here
Have you visited your favorite touch tank on Near Island recently? If yes, I am sure you noticed the eerie absence of one of the most common and endearing organisms that every child and many adults cherish: the sea stars. What happened to the sea stars? Usually, when a child at the touch tank asks a question it is something innocent and simple that we have an answer to. The question about what happened to the sea ...
Sep 02, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Exotic ticks found on Alaska dogs, humans
While Alaskans have long endured dense mosquitoes and frigid air, we’ve always had the absence of venomous snakes and dog ticks. But the latter may be establishing themselves here. Ticks that infest red squirrels, snowshoe hares and a variety of birds have always been present in Alaska, but a team of biologists and veterinarians recently found five non-native ticks on Alaska dogs and people. In a recent study publ...
Aug 31, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 56 56 recommendations | email to a friend
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ALASKA SCIENCE FORUM: Rugged geologists filled out map on horseback
Alfred Brooks was a geologist who traveled thousands of miles in Alaska and left his name on the state’s northernmost mountain range. Twenty years before his death in 1924, he also left behind a summary of what Alaska was like more than one century ago, when “large areas (were) still practically unexplored.” In his 1906 government report, “Geography and Geology of Alaska: A Summary of Existing Knowledge,” Brooks p...
Aug 24, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 70 70 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Flood control project saving Fairbanks heaps
MOOSE CREEK DAM — For the 13th consecutive day, four plates of steel in a framework of concrete have quietly saved Fairbanks. Heavy rains in the basin of the Chena River, the waterway that spawned Fairbanks, have swelled the river to where motorboats can’t squeeze beneath downtown bridges. Dam-tenders here have responded by lowering steel gates into the river. The gates skim river water, backing it into an immense...
Aug 10, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 81 81 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Tight evidence for what killed St. Paul mammoths
Using the tiniest of clues, scientists have determined what probably killed the mammoths of St. Paul Island — thirst. “It looks like climate did them in,” said Matthew Wooller, the UAF scientist who in 2013 went to St. Paul as part of a diverse team and brought back lake cores for analysis. “The smoking gun looks like access to freshwater resources was the coup de grâce.” Wooller and other researchers have been wo...
Aug 03, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 76 76 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Moose hard to locate on Tanana River
LOWER TANANA RIVER — On a day like this 121 years ago, a hungry U.S. Army explorer passed here at the mouth of Fish Creek, where clear water collides with the cloudy Tanana. Henry Allen did not stop to fish. He had food, and further exploration, on his mind as he and his party paddled by in a skin boat. We have stopped our canoes, squirted on insect repellant and cast lures hoping for pike or especially sheefish, ...
Jul 06, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 95 95 recommendations | email to a friend
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Healthy Kodiak: Thinking of abdominal pain
Greetings fellow islanders! I would like to share some of my thoughts on upper abdominal pain. That is, pain that occurs between the belly button and the bottom of the ribs. There are many organs in the upper abdomen and other parts of the body that can cause such pain: the heart, stomach, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, blood vessels, liver, small bowel, esophagus, and the list goes on. The pain from any of these ...
Jun 29, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 104 104 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: After solstice, warmest days still ahead
A person might think that since we get our maximum sunlight on the summer solstice (on or about June 21), we should also get our peak warmth then. The sun’s calling the shots, right? Not entirely, said former Alaskan Martha Shulski, author of “The Climate of Alaska” and now climatologist for the state of Nebraska. “Alaska is warmest a few weeks after the solstice,” she said. A lag exists between the peak of solar ...
Jun 29, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 95 95 recommendations | email to a friend
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