Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Dec. 5
Cikuq Ice Nanwat cikumaut. The lakes are frozen over. Kodiak may lie south of the frozen Arctic regions of Alaska, but from 1852 to 1870 it was a known for its ice. In the 1850s the California gold rush was in full swing, and the West Coast needed ice to preserve food. Russian American Company officials saw an economic opportunity and established contracts to sell ice in San Francisco. Ice production began in Sitk...
Dec 05, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Nuniaq — Old Harbor
Nuniaq Old Harbor Nuniarmiuq-qaa ellpet? Are you an Old Harbor person? The community of Old Harbor (Nuniaq) has its origins in the era of Russian conquest. In 1784, Russian traders massacred several hundred Alutiiq men, women, and children at Refuge Rock, a tiny island off the eastern coast of Sitkalidak Island. In Alutiiq, this sacred place is known as Awa’uq: to become numb. To many it represents a dramatic turn...
Nov 21, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Atmak; Ekgwik; Ekguiyutaq — Hunting Bag; Backpack
Atmak; Ekgwik; Ekguiyutaq — Hunting Bag; Backpack Atmangq’rtuq. — He has a backpack. Packing well for a hunting or fishing trip was as important in the past as it is today. Alutiiq men filled their kayaks with useful things: wooden containers filled with fresh food and water, sleeping blankets, and even inflated seal bladders for emergency buoyancy — the personal flotation devices of the past. Each hunter also car...
Oct 31, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Tuullek; Tuulautek — Tongs
Tuullek; Tuulautek — Tongs Keniyaqama tuulautek aturtaagka. — When I cook I use tongs. Tongs were common tools in ancestral Alutiiq households. Carvers fashioned these implements by lashing together two lengths of wood shaped with flat oval ends. This created an effective tool for moving hot rocks. Heating rocks was a daily task, as people used hot stones to warm their homes, cook foods and create steam for bathin...
Oct 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Tuma; Tumet - Footprint
Tuma; Tumet - Footprint Taqukaraat tumait ang’ut. - The bears' footprints are large. Like animal tracks, human footprints are a common part of the Kodiak environment. Today Kodiak’s muddy shores capture the tread of sneakers and rubber boots, but in the past, they recorded the passage of bare feet. Kodiak Alutiiq people seldom wore shoes, saving hand-sewn footwear of salmon skins and sea mammal hide for the coldes...
Oct 17, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Uksuaq - Fall
Uksuaq - Fall Uksuartuq awa’i. - It is fall now. Fall along Alaska’s gulf coast arrives with a palette of changing colors. The hills fade from green to gold, coastal meadows blaze with bright red fireweed and elderberry leaves, and the skies darken from blue to grey as the days shorten and winter storms reappear. For Alutiiqs, fall was a time of preparation. Subsistence activities turned from the sea toward the la...
Oct 10, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Caguyaq - Hunting Hat
Caguyaq - Hunting Hat Caguyaq qupuramek canamauq. - The hunting hat is made of wood. In the cool, wet Kodiak environment, hats are an essential item of clothing. Among Alutiiqs, headgear was once fashioned from many different materials. Warm, water-resistant hats were sewn from animal pelts and loon skins, woven from spruce root, and carved from wood. The most spectacular of these were bentwood hats, expertly bent...
Oct 03, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Lla - Weather; Sky; Outdoors; Universe; World
Lla - Weather; Sky; Outdoors; Universe; World Lla Asirtuq. - The weather is good. The world's cultures have a great variety of beliefs about the sky. Tlingit people see the sky as an upside-down bowl with a hard surface. Their sky has layers that provide a home for the souls of those died from violence. The ancient Inuit saw the sky as a dome covering a flat earth resting on pillars. In their worldview there were ...
Sep 26, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Kasukuak - Akhiok
Kasukuak - Akhiok Kasukuarmiu’ak taugkuk. - Those two are from Akhiok. Surrounded by grassy hills and tundra flats, Akhiok is Kodiak’s southernmost Alutiiq village. The present location of this remote community, ninety miles from the City of Kodiak, was settled in 1881. Additional residents moved here from Kasukuak in nearby Humpy Cove. The original community was a sea otter hunting settlement established by Russi...
Sep 19, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Cimiyuq - Cilrayuk - Dragonfly
Cilrayuk - Dragonfly Cilrayuk alingtaakait. - They used to be afraid of the dragonfly. Did you know that Alaska has an official insect? In 1995, the state’s school children awarded the dragonfly this special honor. The four-spotted skimmer (Libellula quadrimaculata) took the prize. Like the other 30 species of dragonflies in Alaska, this insect can eat up to 600 flies or mosquitos a day and it is a spectacular fli...
Sep 12, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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