Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Science
 
ALASKA SCIENCE FORUM: Rugged geologists filled out map on horseback
Alfred Brooks was a geologist who traveled thousands of miles in Alaska and left his name on the state’s northernmost mountain range. Twenty years before his death in 1924, he also left behind a summary of what Alaska was like more than one century ago, when “large areas (were) still practically unexplored.” In his 1906 government report, “Geography and Geology of Alaska: A Summary of Existing Knowledge,” Brooks p...
Aug 24, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Flood control project saving Fairbanks heaps
MOOSE CREEK DAM — For the 13th consecutive day, four plates of steel in a framework of concrete have quietly saved Fairbanks. Heavy rains in the basin of the Chena River, the waterway that spawned Fairbanks, have swelled the river to where motorboats can’t squeeze beneath downtown bridges. Dam-tenders here have responded by lowering steel gates into the river. The gates skim river water, backing it into an immense...
Aug 10, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Tight evidence for what killed St. Paul mammoths
Using the tiniest of clues, scientists have determined what probably killed the mammoths of St. Paul Island — thirst. “It looks like climate did them in,” said Matthew Wooller, the UAF scientist who in 2013 went to St. Paul as part of a diverse team and brought back lake cores for analysis. “The smoking gun looks like access to freshwater resources was the coup de grâce.” Wooller and other researchers have been wo...
Aug 03, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Moose hard to locate on Tanana River
LOWER TANANA RIVER — On a day like this 121 years ago, a hungry U.S. Army explorer passed here at the mouth of Fish Creek, where clear water collides with the cloudy Tanana. Henry Allen did not stop to fish. He had food, and further exploration, on his mind as he and his party paddled by in a skin boat. We have stopped our canoes, squirted on insect repellant and cast lures hoping for pike or especially sheefish, ...
Jul 06, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: After solstice, warmest days still ahead
A person might think that since we get our maximum sunlight on the summer solstice (on or about June 21), we should also get our peak warmth then. The sun’s calling the shots, right? Not entirely, said former Alaskan Martha Shulski, author of “The Climate of Alaska” and now climatologist for the state of Nebraska. “Alaska is warmest a few weeks after the solstice,” she said. A lag exists between the peak of solar ...
Jun 29, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend
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Healthy Kodiak: Thinking of abdominal pain
Greetings fellow islanders! I would like to share some of my thoughts on upper abdominal pain. That is, pain that occurs between the belly button and the bottom of the ribs. There are many organs in the upper abdomen and other parts of the body that can cause such pain: the heart, stomach, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, blood vessels, liver, small bowel, esophagus, and the list goes on. The pain from any of these ...
Jun 29, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 38 38 recommendations | email to a friend
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ALASKA SCIENCE FORUM: Foam on water a sign of life and death
While sitting in the front of a canoe on a twisty Alaska creek, my daughter asked to steer closer to the riverbank. She wanted to grab some suds. There, caught in the elbows of fallen trees, were quivering mounds of white foam. Foam is floating on most Alaska waterways this summer. Years ago, when I first saw yellowish suds on a creek that ran behind my cabin, I thought of something manmade and nasty spilled upstr...
Jun 16, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Fire breaks down, builds up boreal forest
I once wrote about how fire had ravaged more than 10 percent of Interior Alaska during two smoky summers. A wildlife biologist called me out for choosing an inadequate verb. Tom Paragi chooses words that are more positive when he looks at a burned forest. Paragi works with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Fairbanks. His specialty is the ecology of disturbances to the boreal forest, among them logging and ...
Jun 08, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 35 35 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Historic changes in species, water, on Kenai Peninsula
Larger than West Virginia, the Kenai Peninsula has the best of Alaska: coastal rainforests, two icefields, majestic deepwater fiords and a sapphire river home to the largest king salmon ever caught. It also has some of the best-documented changes of any geographic feature in Alaska, enough that a biologist now sees the peninsula evolving into a human-driven system. John Morton of the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge...
May 25, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 56 56 recommendations | email to a friend
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ALASKA SCIENCE FORUM: Much of Arctic now significantly lower
When botanist Janet Jorgenson first visited a patch of tundra east of Kaktovik in 1988, it was flat, dry and thick with 29 species of lichens and mosses. Now, Tapkaurak is wet, gullied and fragrant with sedges and grasses. And, like other parts of Alaska’s North Slope, it is a few feet farther from the clouds. Tapkaurak is part of what might be an Arctic-wide thawing, draining and settling of the landscape. More t...
May 19, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 52 52 recommendations | email to a friend
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