Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Taariq: Steam bath scrubber
Taariq: Steam bath scrubber Taariq taiski: Bring me the scrubber. No trip to the steam bath is complete without switches and scrubbers made from local plants. Alutiiq people use these tools to enhance the cleansing and healing powers of steam. Switches are made from a variety of leafy branches, including alder and Kenai birch, while scrubbers are fashioned from wild ryegrass roots (Elymus sp.). To make scrubbers, ...
Jun 22, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - June 15, 2012
Sun’alleq: Three Saints Bay Sun’allrmen agyugtua: I want to go to Three Saints Bay. Three Saints Bay is a narrow, 8.7 mile-long embayment on the southeastern side of Kodiak Island. The shores of this productive waterway have been home to Alutiiq people for millennia. Nestled between larger Kaiugnak Bay and Sitkalidak Strait at the foot of some of Kodiak’s tallest mountains, the bay is known for its ancient settlem...
Jun 15, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - June 8, 2012
Guuteq: Tooth  Guut’ka anq’rtuq: My tooth hurts. You can tell a lot about a person from their teeth. Genetic factors like race and environmental conditions like diet influence the shape and condition of people’s dentition. For example, anthropologists note that people of Native American descent, including Alutiiqs, frequently have shovel-shaped upper incisors. Their front cutting teeth have curved inner edges that...
Jun 08, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - June 1, 2012
Uq’uRuta1: Garden Uq’uRutaq miktuq: This garden is small Although Alutiiq people have long enjoyed wild fruits and vegetables, gardening is a recent pursuit. Russian colonists were the first to attempt cultivation in Kodiak’s fertile soil, growing grains and vegetables. Barley crops fared well, but wheat failed to ripen in the cool, wet summer months. Vegetable crops were more successful. As early as 1790, Russian...
Jun 01, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq word of the week — Goose tongue plants
Weg’uat: Goose tongue plants Weg’uat piturnirtut: The goose tongue plants taste good. Goose tongue (Plantago maritime) is a low-lying plantain, an herb that grows in coastal wetlands on beaches, cliffs and marshes across southern Alaska. This plant resembles a clump of grass. It has long, narrow, pointed leaves that grow in bunches from its base. These leaves are thick and succulent and a favorite food of bears. F...
May 25, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Willow
Uqgwingcut or Nimruyaq: Willow Nimruyat nautaartut nunami: Willows always grow on the land. There are more than 50 species of willow (Salix spp.) in Alaska. One botanist estimates that 17 of these species can be found in the Kodiak region. Although most Alaska willows are shrub-sized plants, northern species can range in size from dwarf bushes to full-sized tress. Willows thrive in moist soils, particularly along ...
May 18, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Uncle
Angaq: Uncle Angaqa kanagtuuq: My uncle is tall. Alutiiq people reckon descent bilaterally. This means that children trace their ancestry equally through their mother’s and father’s lineages. A child is recognized as belonging to both sides of his or her family. While Alutiiqs share this practice with the Yup’ik, Iñupiaq and Inuit societies of northern Alaska and Canada, they are unique in the Gulf of Alaska. Neig...
May 11, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Skiff
Skiigwaq or TuuRaq: Skiff TuuRaliguanga: I am building a skiff. Before the availability of aluminum skiffs and powerful motors and winches, Alutiiq fishermen relied on wooden dories and their own physical strength to harvest salmon. Setnetting, beach seining and ocean seining were done with high-sided, flat-bottomed skiffs propelled by rowing. These skiffs appeared in the late 19th century, during the first years ...
May 04, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - April 20, 2012
Qikarlluk: Sinew  Qikarllut tuknirtaartut:  Sinew is strong. Sinew is a fibrous, inelastic tissue that comes from the tendons and ligaments of animals. Bands, cords and sheets of this white material connect muscles with bones and support internal organs. Alutiiq people once harvested sinew from a variety of mammals, although the long, strong tendons of bears, whales, and porpoises were particularly coveted. Seamst...
Apr 20, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - April 6, 2012
Suumacirpet: Subsistence Suumacirpet asirpiatuq: Our way of living is the best. There is no easy way to translate the word “subsistence” into the Alutiiq language. Westerners often think of subsistence as the process of obtaining and eating wild foods, an alternative to buying groceries. This definition, however, fails to capture the complexities of living off the land.  To the Alutiiq people, subsistence is life....
Apr 06, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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