Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
A voyage to St. Matthew
Fifty-five summers ago, when Dave Klein first stepped on St. Matthew Island, driftwood on the beaches held no plastic bottles and hundreds of reindeer roamed the tundra hills. When the 85-year-old naturalist returns next week for his sixth trip to one of the most remote islands of the world, he knows he’ll see lots of plastic and no reindeer, along with some changes he can’t yet imagine. “It’s such a fabulous plac...
Aug 01, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Amazing Nature: Tides and red tides sweep in on the Fourth
Recently, Kodiak joined the rest of the Nation in the annual Independence Day festivities. The Fourth of July wouldn’t be the same without fireworks, and as a parent of a teenage boy I know he looks forward to this occasion to live out his pyromaniac desires. As we traveled to our favorite fireworks location shortly before midnight with the trunk full of fireworks and two excited boys in the rear seat of the car, ...
Jul 20, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alaska Science Forum: Examining the fly that bugs Alaskans
While boating down the Yukon River during the hottest summer recorded in Alaska (1915, when Fort Yukon reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit), missionary Hudson Stuck wrote about the wildlife that most bothered his party. “With the failure of a little breeze and the overcasting of the sky, the weather grows oppressively sultry and a swarm of horse-flies, or moose-flies as they are called in these parts, makes appearance ...
Jul 18, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alaska Science Forum: Cold War’s odd arctic innovations
“Rectal Temperature of the Working Sled Dog.” “Cleaning and Sterilization of Bunny Boots.” “Comparative Sweat Rates of Eskimos and Caucasians Under Controlled Conditions.” These are some of the studies completed by scientists who worked for the Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory from the late 1940s to the 1960s. Developed during the Cold War to “solve the severe environmental problems of men living and working in the A...
Jul 11, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alaska Science Forum: Camera captures curious canine
Sometimes you get lucky. Ken Tape feels that way, after a time-lapse camera he set up in northern Alaska captured a full-frame portrait of a wolf. He shared the image with me, and, now, with you. This spring, Tape, author of the book “The Changing Arctic Landscape,” set up 14 time-lapse cameras in Alaska north of the Arctic Circle. He programmed them to snap one picture every 15 minutes from April 24 to May 23. He...
Jul 05, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alaska Science Forum: Dinosaurs’ footprints found in Wrangell Mountains
The more Tony Fiorillo explores Alaska, the more dinosaur tracks he finds on its lonely ridgetops. The latest examples are the stone footprints of two different dinosaurs near the tiny settlement of Chisana in the Wrangell Mountains. Fiorillo, a dinosaur hunter with the Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, recently wrote of the foot impressions of a large plant-eater and small meat-eater in the science journal ...
Jun 27, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Your hair knows where you’ve been
Sprouting from your head at the rate of more than three inches a year, hair is a recorder of the things you eat and drink and where you ate and drank them. An Ottawa-based researcher has just assembled a countrywide database of Canadians’ hair designed to help the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. With a likeable partner who had a talent for persuading strangers to part with a snip of hair, Michelle Chartrand for the...
Jun 20, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alaska Science Forum: Writer’s 25 years of changes
Not too long ago, I passed a milestone that doesn’t really mean much, but is a nice round number. Twenty-five years ago, I drove a Ford Courier pickup from Upstate New York to Fairbanks. I rolled into town in August, started college in September, and have lived here ever since. Twenty-five years isn’t such a long time, but it’s longer than I’ve lived anywhere else. Scientists consider one-quarter century a long-te...
Jun 13, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alaska Science Forum: Writer's 25 years of change
Not too long ago, I passed a milestone that doesn’t really mean much, but is a nice round number. Twenty-five years ago, I drove a Ford Courier pickup from Upstate New York to Fairbanks. I rolled into town in August, started college in September, and have lived here ever since. Twenty-five years isn’t such a long time, but it’s longer than I’ve lived anywhere else. Scientists consider one-quarter century a long-te...
Jun 13, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Katmai-Novarupta, 1912-2012: A wary eye
By JAMES BROOKS Mirror Editor For the past week, Kodiak has focused on the tragedy of 1912, when a volcano in today’s Katmai National Park sent ash skyward, coating Kodiak Island with more than two feet of powdered gray rock. A century has passed since that eruption, but is Kodiak any safer from a big volcanic eruption today? “It’s really interesting to think about what would happen now with a 1912-style eruption,...
Jun 08, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Search Our Marketplace
or Search by category