Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Science
 
Alaska Science Forum: Writer's 25 years of change
Not too long ago, I passed a milestone that doesn’t really mean much, but is a nice round number. Twenty-five years ago, I drove a Ford Courier pickup from Upstate New York to Fairbanks. I rolled into town in August, started college in September, and have lived here ever since. Twenty-five years isn’t such a long time, but it’s longer than I’ve lived anywhere else. Scientists consider one-quarter century a long-te...
Jun 13, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Katmai-Novarupta, 1912-2012: A wary eye
By JAMES BROOKS Mirror Editor For the past week, Kodiak has focused on the tragedy of 1912, when a volcano in today’s Katmai National Park sent ash skyward, coating Kodiak Island with more than two feet of powdered gray rock. A century has passed since that eruption, but is Kodiak any safer from a big volcanic eruption today? “It’s really interesting to think about what would happen now with a 1912-style eruption,...
Jun 08, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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Katmai-Novarupta, 1912-2012: Explosion of science
As you read this, 18 students and professors are scrambling on the slopes of Mount Katmai on a trip organized by the University of Alaska. While most tourists to Katmai National Park have eyes only for bears, these men and women are on a quest for rocks. The site of the largest volcanic eruption in the 20th century has now become a classroom for educating young volcanologists. As they learn, they continue a tradit...
Jun 07, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: 100 years since the Big One
On June 6, 1912, if you happened to be sitting on a log outside your cabin near Fairbanks, Juneau or Dawson City, you would have heard an explosion. There was no way to know the boom came from hundreds of miles away, or that it was the starting gun for the largest volcanic eruption of the 1900s. Nor would you imagine that in the next three days a mountain would collapse upon itself, or that ash and hot gases would...
Jun 06, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Arctic lakes getting a closer look
Minnesota is the Land of 10,000 Lakes, but Alaska has more than that in the great expanse of flatlands north of the Brooks Range. These ubiquitous far-north bodies of water — most of them formed by the disappearance of ancient, buried ice that dimples the landscape as it thaws — make the maps of Alaska’s coastal plain look like Swiss cheese. A large group of scientists are now taking a closer look at Alaska’s “the...
May 30, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: The tiny universe on a glacier
A scientist wearing plastic boots and crampons knelt on Gulkana Glacier and pointed at the king of beasts, a snow flea. “He is the top of the food chain on this glacier,” said biologist Nozomu Takeuchi. The snow flea, a tiny wingless insect also known as a springtail, sprang away at the advance of Takeuchi’s finger, landing near a stream of meltwater. Takeuchi opened a notebook and scribbled with a pencil. He was ...
May 23, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Feathered invader flocks to the north
A while back, Ron Koczaja was walking a riverbank in Kasigluk with a village elder when a large, striking bird perched on a powerline. “What is that bird?” the woman asked. “A magpie,” said Koczaja, a teacher in the village. “What’s it called in Yupik?” “I don’t know,” she said. “Them birds never used to be here. There is no word.” Koczaja, a math teacher at Ryan Middle School in Fairbanks, remembered this exchang...
May 18, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Amazing Nature: Underwater gardens filter harbor
On a nice spring day in Kodiak it is a delight to take a stroll along the harbor and let your gaze wander past the mountains in the distance, the breakwaters lined by sea birds and the boats gleaming in the sunshine. Strolling along the docks, you can try to see what lies beneath the surface and you will discover that the dock itself is home to a multitude of life forms. Each float is overgrown with a garden compo...
May 11, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: North Slope wolf's epic trip ends abruptly
Thanks to information from a collar that communicated with satellites, a biologist has closed the book on the long journey of a male wolf that left its pack one year ago and wandered thousands of miles through northern Alaska. When I last wrote about the wolf in August 2011, the silvery black creature was somewhere in the rolling tundra east of Deadhorse, having traveled more than 1,500 miles from its former home ...
May 09, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Siberian language shows mysterious link to Alaska
Spoken by only a few dozen people, a language uttered in river villages 3,000 miles from Alaska is related to Tlingit, Eyak and Athabaskan. This curious link has researchers wondering how people in the middle of Siberia can be related to Alaskans and other North Americans, and what it means to the populating of the Americas. When he visited Kellog Village in central Siberia a few years ago, Edward Vajda stirred th...
May 02, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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