Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Science
 
Alaska Science Forum: Dinosaurs’ footprints found in Wrangell Mountains
The more Tony Fiorillo explores Alaska, the more dinosaur tracks he finds on its lonely ridgetops. The latest examples are the stone footprints of two different dinosaurs near the tiny settlement of Chisana in the Wrangell Mountains. Fiorillo, a dinosaur hunter with the Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, recently wrote of the foot impressions of a large plant-eater and small meat-eater in the science journal ...
Jun 27, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Your hair knows where you’ve been
Sprouting from your head at the rate of more than three inches a year, hair is a recorder of the things you eat and drink and where you ate and drank them. An Ottawa-based researcher has just assembled a countrywide database of Canadians’ hair designed to help the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. With a likeable partner who had a talent for persuading strangers to part with a snip of hair, Michelle Chartrand for the...
Jun 20, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Writer’s 25 years of changes
Not too long ago, I passed a milestone that doesn’t really mean much, but is a nice round number. Twenty-five years ago, I drove a Ford Courier pickup from Upstate New York to Fairbanks. I rolled into town in August, started college in September, and have lived here ever since. Twenty-five years isn’t such a long time, but it’s longer than I’ve lived anywhere else. Scientists consider one-quarter century a long-te...
Jun 13, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Writer's 25 years of change
Not too long ago, I passed a milestone that doesn’t really mean much, but is a nice round number. Twenty-five years ago, I drove a Ford Courier pickup from Upstate New York to Fairbanks. I rolled into town in August, started college in September, and have lived here ever since. Twenty-five years isn’t such a long time, but it’s longer than I’ve lived anywhere else. Scientists consider one-quarter century a long-te...
Jun 13, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Katmai-Novarupta, 1912-2012: A wary eye
By JAMES BROOKS Mirror Editor For the past week, Kodiak has focused on the tragedy of 1912, when a volcano in today’s Katmai National Park sent ash skyward, coating Kodiak Island with more than two feet of powdered gray rock. A century has passed since that eruption, but is Kodiak any safer from a big volcanic eruption today? “It’s really interesting to think about what would happen now with a 1912-style eruption,...
Jun 08, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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Katmai-Novarupta, 1912-2012: Explosion of science
As you read this, 18 students and professors are scrambling on the slopes of Mount Katmai on a trip organized by the University of Alaska. While most tourists to Katmai National Park have eyes only for bears, these men and women are on a quest for rocks. The site of the largest volcanic eruption in the 20th century has now become a classroom for educating young volcanologists. As they learn, they continue a tradit...
Jun 07, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: 100 years since the Big One
On June 6, 1912, if you happened to be sitting on a log outside your cabin near Fairbanks, Juneau or Dawson City, you would have heard an explosion. There was no way to know the boom came from hundreds of miles away, or that it was the starting gun for the largest volcanic eruption of the 1900s. Nor would you imagine that in the next three days a mountain would collapse upon itself, or that ash and hot gases would...
Jun 06, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Arctic lakes getting a closer look
Minnesota is the Land of 10,000 Lakes, but Alaska has more than that in the great expanse of flatlands north of the Brooks Range. These ubiquitous far-north bodies of water — most of them formed by the disappearance of ancient, buried ice that dimples the landscape as it thaws — make the maps of Alaska’s coastal plain look like Swiss cheese. A large group of scientists are now taking a closer look at Alaska’s “the...
May 30, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: The tiny universe on a glacier
A scientist wearing plastic boots and crampons knelt on Gulkana Glacier and pointed at the king of beasts, a snow flea. “He is the top of the food chain on this glacier,” said biologist Nozomu Takeuchi. The snow flea, a tiny wingless insect also known as a springtail, sprang away at the advance of Takeuchi’s finger, landing near a stream of meltwater. Takeuchi opened a notebook and scribbled with a pencil. He was ...
May 23, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Feathered invader flocks to the north
A while back, Ron Koczaja was walking a riverbank in Kasigluk with a village elder when a large, striking bird perched on a powerline. “What is that bird?” the woman asked. “A magpie,” said Koczaja, a teacher in the village. “What’s it called in Yupik?” “I don’t know,” she said. “Them birds never used to be here. There is no word.” Koczaja, a math teacher at Ryan Middle School in Fairbanks, remembered this exchang...
May 18, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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