Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alaska Science Forum: Scientists’ confab reviews glaciers, tsunamis of 2011
SAN FRANCISCO — For the 13th straight year, I’m happy to be spending one week of December here, at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union, where more than 15,000 scientists gather for a week to discuss the latest news of the world. Here are a few items from the first two days. Bering Glacier has stopped its rush Alaska’s largest glacier, located near the hinge where Southeast connects to Southcentral, ...
Dec 14, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Flying machines that do the dangerous jobs
Some places in this world are just too dirty, dull or dangerous for human pilots to fly. An airspace in the latter category is anywhere near gas flares in Alaska’s oilfields. With only a few seconds of warning, flames blast high in the air from a network of pipes, releasing the stress of sucking oil from deep in the ground. Greg Walker recently found himself taking a look these fire-breathing nozzles near Prudhoe ...
Dec 07, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Ground-based radar tracks speeding glacier
Using some of the great datasets available today, Mark Fahnestock figured the average winter temperatures of the Arctic from the time he was born until he was 10 years old. He compared that data to the same period in his son’s life, finding the Arctic has warmed about five degrees since Fahnestock was his son’s age. All that warmth affects things, the scientist said at a recent meeting in Fairbanks. “The glaciers ...
Nov 30, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: This November is cold, but it's no 1989
For many Alaskans, January 1989 is a month that still numbs the mind, because of the cold snap that gripped much of the state for two weeks. In Fairbanks, fan belts under the hoods of cars snapped like pretzels; the ice fog was thick and smothering, and the city came as close as it ever comes to a halt, with many people opting to stay home after their vehicles succumbed to the monster cold. The 14 days of bitter c...
Nov 23, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: New dinosaur discovered in northern Alaska
There’s a new kind of dinosaur out there, and it lived in Alaska. Its bones, long turned to stone, are part of a cliff in northern Alaska. That’s where dinosaur-hunter Tony Fiorillo brushed dirt away from a portion of its massive skull – something that most of us would mistake for a rock. The year was 2006. It was August and summer had fled the Colville River, if it had been there at all. Fiorillo, who visits Alas...
Nov 16, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Alaska's animals would flourish without people
In Alan Weisman’s book “The World Without Us,” the author ponders “a world from which we all suddenly vanished. Tomorrow.” In last week’s column, a few experts discussed the fate of Alaska structures if Alaskans were to disappear. This week, people who study Alaska’s wildlife donate some thought to the subject. Alaska’s lack of people has benefited many species, including caribou, which still outnumber Alaskans, a...
Nov 02, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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Amazing Nature: Hagfishes bring Halloween spirit year-round
The spirit of Halloween is all about witches and hags and creatures from the impenetrable dark. It seems fitting to dedicate this article to a creature that lives in the darkness of the ocean depths scavenging for worms and dead animals and was thus called the “hagfish.” Their bodies are eel-like, dark gray like the mud they live in with sensory barbels around a jawless mouth. Hagfishes live in the cold waters at ...
Oct 28, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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Who’s watching who?
Last Saturday, these two raptors were spotted by a group of Audubon birders along the road to Pasagshak, not far from Kalsin Bay. Both the hawk owl, right, and the Northern Goshawk are not very commonly seen, especially not right along the road and only a few hundred feet apart. (Stacy Studebaker photos)
Oct 28, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Alaska buildings stick around long after people
In Alan Weisman’s book, “The World Without Us,” the author ponders “a world from which we all suddenly vanished. Tomorrow.” In his great thought experiment, Weisman travels around the world to explore that question, revealing that cockroaches and bedbugs would not fare well without our sloppiness and warmth, and that Theodore Roosevelt’s granite face will stare down from Mount Rushmore for the next 7.2 million yea...
Oct 26, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Amazing Nature: Anglerfish embody Halloween spirit in ocean’s depths
Fall in Kodiak is the time for people to get out their lures and try to capture some fish. Like hunting, angling awakens the primeval instincts of fighting for food and making the kill like any predatory animal worth its place in nature. It’s a good feeling to bring home fresh food for the family as a result of ones efforts and wits — a satisfaction that has been sadly lost in our modern means of food “hunting” in...
Oct 14, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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