Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: "Fried bread"
Alatiq/Alaciq: fried bread Gwangkuta alacirturtaartukut: We always eat fried bread. Travel almost anywhere in Native America and you will find fried bread. This beloved food is a common addition to meals, a staple at celebrations, and a symbol of intertribal unity. Alutiiq communities are no exception. Fried bread is favorite food that is often found at gatherings, offered with holiday meals, and served to guests....
Dec 02, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Plate
Qantaq/Alutaq: plate Qantaq asircaru: You fix the plate. In classical Alutiiq society, dishes were made from wood, fiber and bone. People ate from decorated bowls carved from a solid piece of wood or food containers created by pegging a bentwood rim to a wooden base. Drinking cups were woven from grass or spruce root, and some archaeologists think Alutiiqs used pieces of whalebone as cutting boards or plates. West...
Nov 25, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: "Home brew"
Piiwaq: home brew, beer, liquor Piiwaq piturnaituq: Home brew tastes bad. Although historic sources report that Alutiiq people once fermented salmonberry juice to create a sour, mildly alcoholic beverage, Russian fur traders were the first to introduce large-scale brewing. Accounts indicate that traders were a hard-drinking group who enjoyed brandy, rum, vodka and gin imported from Siberia. Although they were not ...
Nov 18, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Qetek: Coal
Qetek: Coal Qetegmek canamauq: That is made of coal. Coal is a black or dark brown sedimentary rock formed from decomposed and compressed plant material. There are a number of coal occurrences in the Kodiak region. Lignite, a soft coal, occurs along the southeastern coast of the archipelago, in Kiliuda Bay, around Sitkalidak Island and on the Aliulik Peninsula. Additionally, coal scientists report the presence of ...
Nov 11, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Ghost
Tanraq: ghost Tanrat alingnartaartut: Ghosts are really scary! In the Alutiiq universe, ghosts are the physical manifestation of human and animal souls, and they are associated with death and reincarnation. When a person or an animal dies, their soul is released from their body to return to life. A person’s soul is in their breath and can be reincarnated five times before reaching eternal rest in the sky world. In...
Nov 04, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week
Suarnituluni: Wild-tasting Tuntuq una suarnituuq: This deer is gamey/wild-tasting. Wild meats can have a gamey taste. There are people who claim to like this flavor, but most prefer to avoid eating gamey steaks and roasts. To prevent filling their larders with wild-tasting deer, elk, goat or bear, Alutiiqs take two essential steps: They harvest the right animals at the right time of year, and they process their ki...
Oct 28, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week
KuRuwaq: Cow KuRuwaq quiliuq: The Cow is fat. Russian fur traders introduced cattle to Kodiak. When Gregorii Shelikov arrived in Kodiak in 1784, he noted the abundance of local grasses and sent orders to Russia to import cattle from Siberia. According to a report by Billings, there were cattle at the Three Saints Bay colony by 1790, just six years later. Early imported cattle fared well and became a staple resourc...
Oct 21, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week — Oct. 7
Paluqtat: Beavers Pingayun paluqtat kuigmi et’ut: There are three beavers in the creek. Although beavers (Castor canadensis) thrive around the Kodiak archipelago today, they are not part of the region’s original fauna. Beavers were introduced to archipelago in 1925 in an effort to provide valuable game for trapping and a commodity for the fashion industry. Most beaver trapping was done in the fall and winter, afte...
Oct 07, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week
Cikiluku: Splash it! Yaamat cikikii: Splash the rocks. It’s Saturday evening and curls of smoke drift from the small shed next to an Alutiiq home. It is banya night, and a family has lit the wood stove in their bathhouse to heat rocks and water for washing. Inside, smooth, water-worn beach cobbles cover a stove fashioned from an oil drum and surrounded by tubs of fresh water. When the rocks are hot, family members...
Sep 30, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week
KuRiic’kiiq/Kuliic’kiiq: Snipe KuRiic’kiit miktut, kesiin piturnirtut: Snipes are small, but they taste good. The common snipe (Gallinago gallinago) is a shorebird found around Kodiak’s grassy coastal meadows, ponds and fields in summer. This member of the sandpiper family breeds yearly across northern North America, then heads south to winter in warmer climates. A small bird, the snipe has a long, straight bill d...
Sep 23, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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