Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alaska Science Forum: Polar bears walk shrinking treadmill of ice
Polar bears walking a treadmill of ice Stronger winds and thinner ice are forcing Alaska polar bears to work harder to remain in Alaska, according to scientists who have studied increased movements of both sea ice and bears. “There’s an energetic cost to stay in Alaska,” said David Douglas of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Center. He and others compared wanderings of polar bears from two periods and found the ...
Feb 10, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Cook Inlet Basin amplifies earthquake shaking
Millions of people live in dimples on the Earth's surface — often near the ocean, in lowlands between mountain peaks too rugged and cold. One of these global indentations, Cook Inlet Basin, recently showed another characteristic of the planet's basins — they quiver like a bowl of jelly during an earthquake. Many people in Anchorage got rattled during the recent 7.1 earthquake on Jan. 24. Carl Tape did not feel the...
Feb 03, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: A case for rallying around sea ice
The ice floating on top of the world covers pretty much the entire Arctic Ocean in midwinter. By late summer it shrinks to half that much. If trends continue, by mid-century the summer ice may take up less space than Japan. As the Arctic Ocean becomes more blue, it absorbs much of the sun’s heat that it once reflected with great efficiency. This warmer ocean would quicken the melt of the Greenland ice cap, which w...
Jan 27, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Mystery of the dancing wires revealed
In this quiet, peaceful time of year, with all the noisy birds flown south and all the scary bears in hillside dens, little things catch our attention. Like wires that move as if by magic. Aurora scientist and interested-in-all-things guy Neal Brown contacted me to see if I had written about why power wires sometimes dance to their own beat when there seems to be no wind or other force pushing them. He notices it ...
Dec 09, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Kenai bark beetles primed for another run
Ed Berg has spent much of his life observing the natural happenings on a large peninsula (the Kenai) that juts from a larger peninsula (Alaska). The retired ecologist who worked many years for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been around long enough he might see a second version of the most damaging insect attack in Alaska history. The insect is the spruce bark beetle. About the size of a grain of rice, bill...
Nov 25, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend
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ALASKA SCIENCE FORUM: Weird world of northern dinosaurs coming into focus
During Patrick Druckenmiller's not-so-restful sabbatical year, he is flying to museums around the world. In Alberta a few weeks ago and London now, the University of Alaska Museum’s curator of earth science is looking at bones of dinosaurs similar to ones found in northern Alaska. The more he squints at them and chats with experts, the more he thinks far-north dinosaurs are like Alaskans compared to other American...
Nov 18, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 42 42 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Pioneer songbird meets an early snowstorm
As piles of wet snow fell, an unexpected guest rapped at the window. My wife, Kristen, heard it bump into the glass. She was soon cupping in her hands a delicate bird she saw perched on the windowsill. "It's a golden-crowned kinglet!" she said. Kristen is a bird biologist, but I was surprised at her identification. Mighty little ruby-crowned kinglets belt out their big songs in our woods each spring, but golden-cr...
Oct 14, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 42 42 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Wood bison returning to wild state
These nights, Tom Seaton is dreaming less about red-brown, steaming, humpbacked hulks. He's also getting more sleep, knowing dozens of wood bison that galloped to freedom behind his snowmachine last spring are wandering new country, munching grass and having babies. So far so good in the attempt to stock Alaska with a giant that vanished from the swamps not long ago. "It's turning out better than I could have hope...
Sep 23, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 54 54 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Alders go their own way in autumn
With every autumn breath we take, Alaska brightens with yellows, reds and oranges of plants recovering what they can from tired solar panels. But one shrubby tree does not join the party. Alders remain a stubborn green. Many won't drop their leaves until long after the snow falls. This reluctance is one of the wonders of an overlooked organism, said ecologist Roger Ruess. A UAF professor, Ruess has studied alders ...
Sep 16, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 54 54 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: HAARP again open for business
Instead of falling to the dozer blade, the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program has new life. In mid-August, U.S. Air Force General Tom Masiello shook hands with UAF's Brian Rogers and Bob McCoy, transferring the powerful upper-atmosphere research facility from the military to the university. You may have heard of HAARP. Nick Begich wrote a book about it. Jesse Ventura tried to bully his way past the Gak...
Sep 09, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 52 52 recommendations | email to a friend
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