Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
Alaska Science Forum: Short, chubby and neurotic is good combination in cold
This message came from the grandfather of 5-year old Ben, who lives near Inverness, Scotland: Even in winter he will rapidly strip off and often plays in a sleeveless vest while others still have a shirt and woolly jumper on. He appears to be always warm. He goes to an excellent school but complains that the rule in winter is that they must wear their coats outside. He finds even a light coat uncomfortable in norm...
Mar 25, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: They don’t make ice mounds like they used to
On a February day long ago, a family living in a sod hut near the Arctic Ocean saw blocks of sea ice bulldozing their way onto shore. Winds shoved more ice until the mass towered above them and started dripping water through a ventilation hole. The father urged his family outside just before a slab fell on the hut and crushed him. An ivu — the Inupiat word for mounds of ice that sometimes plow onto land, powered b...
Mar 04, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: A yearly flood into the Gulf of Alaska
Satellite data has confirmed that the amount of freshwater released into the Gulf of Alaska from streams and rivers in Alaska and northern Canada is about 1.5 times what the Mississippi River dumps into the Gulf of Mexico each year. That astounding flow of water is from rainfalls that soak Southeast Alaska and the south side of the Alaska Range. The other half comes from the melting of snow and ice from glaciers. ...
Feb 25, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 33 33 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Rafts of birds overwintering in the Bering Sea
Like flecks of pepper on chowder, all of the spectacled eiders on the planet are now gathered amid sea ice and steaming open leads in the Bering Sea. "It's a mass of life in this desolate area," said Matt Sexson, who once rode an icebreaker to see the winter gathering south of St. Lawrence Island. Sexson, a biologist with the USGS Science Center in Anchorage, just handed in a draft of his Ph.D. chapter on the crea...
Feb 18, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 39 39 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: The continued mystery of the Denali Gap
North America's highest mountain should be a volcano. Denali sits about 60 miles above where the Pacific Plate grinds beneath the North American plate, as do Iliamna, Redoubt and Augustine. If you draw a line from the Aleutians to volcanic features in interior Alaska, the curve goes over Denali's summit. Like its neighbors in the Alaska Range, the big mountain shows no signs of having erupted. But seismologists re...
Feb 11, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Digging up Augustine's top-heavy legacy
Augustine Volcano sits alone, a 4,000-foot pyramid on its own island in Cook Inlet. Like many volcanoes, it has a tendency to become top heavy. When gravity acts on Augustine's oversteepened dome, rockslides spill into the ocean. A scientist recently found new evidence for an Augustine-generated tsunami from a time when Egyptian pharaohs built their own pyramids. Zebulon Maharrey's record of a tsunami deposit from...
Feb 04, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 38 38 recommendations | email to a friend
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Tidal stresses and giant earthquakes
A scientist once noticed a connection between the stress that tides inflict on the planet and the number of small earthquakes that happen in some areas when that pressure is greatest. She saw a pattern to these earthquakes leading up to great tsunamis. A graduate student is now looking for a similar signal in Alaska. Yen Joe Tan of Columbia University is combing through a database of offshore Alaska earthquakes to...
Jan 28, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 42 42 recommendations | email to a friend
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The demise of Scotch Cap lighthouse
In spring of 1946, five men stationed at the Scotch Cap lighthouse had reasons to be happy. World War II was over. They had survived. Their lonely Coast Guard assignment on Unimak Island would be over in a few months. But the lighthouse tenders would never return to their homes in the Lower 48. In the early morning of April 1, the earth ruptured deep within the Aleutian Trench 90 miles south. An immense block of o...
Jan 21, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 44 44 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: 1946 tsunami survivor shares her story
On April 1, 1946, the sea floor ruptured just south of Unimak Island in the Aleutian Islands. Seawater displaced by the giant earthquake sent a 100-foot wave into the Scotch Cape lighthouse on Unimak, destroying the concrete structure and killing the five men inside. They never knew what hit them in the 2 a.m. darkness. The residents of Hilo, on Hawaii’s big island, were also unaware of the danger surging across t...
Jan 07, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Far-out science at giant gathering on Earth and space
Following a press conference at the enormous fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, an unusual sound was heard in a room of reporters: Applause. Writers and videographers representing news agencies from around the world clapped at the conclusion of a presentation by four scientists involved with the NASA mission to Mars, now in its second year. After a year of cautious data checking, ther...
Dec 31, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend
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