Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alaska Science Forum: Solving the mystery of the South Fork wolf
The wolf lies on a metal table, its white legs and massive paws hanging over the edge. Kimberlee Beckmen, wildlife veterinarian, wears a white lab coat and purple gloves. Scalpel in hand, she positions herself at the wolf’s belly. Beckmen, who just finished a necropsy on an arctic fox that had been hit by a truck on the Dalton Highway, leans in on a wolf found dead on a trail east of Fairbanks. She checked her dat...
Mar 12, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 58 58 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Mystery of the South Fork wolf
The wolf is no longer stuck to the trail, as it was when the dog musher drove her reluctant team over it. Now covered with snow, the frozen animal is a few steps away, beneath small spruce trees near the South Fork of the Chena River. The only exposed part of its body — a bushy tail — points to the sky. Since the musher discovered the dead wolf a few days ago, someone moved the carcass — maybe the trapper who pass...
Mar 05, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 59 59 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: A walk through the UAF Cold Preserve
It’s mid-February, 118 miles from the Arctic Circle. Time for a walk to work. The trail through the boreal forest is right outside my door. The North Campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks is 1,100 acres of spruce trees, ski trails, two lakes, an exotic tree plantation and a few dozen subtle research projects. Some are humming, twirling, measuring. Others are stained by leaf litter, falling back to the soil....
Feb 26, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 54 54 recommendations | email to a friend
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AK Science Forum: Alaskans have enjoyed good earthquake luck since 1964
At the 50th anniversary of one of the world’s largest earthquakes, State Seismologist Mike West says Alaskans might learn a lesson from New Zealand. Here in this land at the meeting point of two restless crustal slabs, no one has died by earthquake since 1964. The magnitude 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake zipped a jagged line through 200 miles of glacier ice and tundra in 2002. A magnitude 7.5 earthquake ruptured just...
Feb 19, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 59 59 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: A great Alaska earthquake meets southern California
An expected event in Alaska could affect millions of Americans. Here’s how: On Thursday, March 27, 2014, a slab of the seafloor larger than human imagination fractures, rumbling beneath the Alaska Peninsula. In several planet-ringing minutes, thousands of years of potential energy releases to become kinetic. A great earthquake occurs right where scientists predicted it would. The Pacific floor plows beneath Alaska...
Feb 12, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 41 41 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Climate researcher says there’s still time, but not much
Painting the breeze one dozen at a time, monarch butterflies once fluttered across the meadow of James Hansen’s Pennsylvania farm. Now, the climate activist and his wife are lucky to see one. Monarchs are threatened by lack of the only food — milkweed — they eat as caterpillars. Herbicides, land clearing and other people-related activities may be dooming the monarchs. “I wonder if we are witnessing the exterminati...
Feb 05, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 63 63 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Northern news from a big conference
How big is the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting? So big it’s like everyone from Barrow attending on Monday. The residents of Soldotna get Tuesday, Valdez Wednesday, Nome Thursday and Kotzebue Friday. More than 21,000 scientists walk through San Francisco’s Moscone Center during the week, along with others, like me, who are curious about what they are presenting. Thanks again to the Geophysical Institute of ...
Jan 29, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 44 44 recommendations | email to a friend
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Feet on the ground right after Alaska’s big one
On March 27, 1964, California geologist George Plafker was attending a research conference in Seattle when news came of a big earthquake in Alaska. “It was almost quitting time for the day at the meeting when some guys came back from the Space Needle and said they felt rocking,” Plafker said recently at his office in Menlo Park, California. “We said, ‘That’s a serious earthquake.’” It was, of course, the second-st...
Jan 15, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 67 67 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Old dogs, Alaska, and the New World
When people first walked across the Bering Land Bridge thousands of years ago, dogs were by their sides, according to researchers who wrote a paper published in the journal Science. Scientists from Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles used dog DNA material — some of it unearthed by miners in interior Alaska — to conclude that today’s domestic dog originated in Asia and accompanied the first humans to the New World abo...
Jan 08, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 55 55 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: In Hawaii, hints of a giant Alaska tsunami
Clues from a crater-like sinkhole on the island of Kauai point back to a giant wave that came from Alaska at about the time European explorers were pushing west, seeing the Mississippi River for the first time. The Makauwahi Sinkhole on the southeast shore of Kauai holds the mysterious equivalent of about nine shipping containers full of rocks, corals and shells from the Pacific Ocean. For the material to breach t...
Jan 02, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 50 50 recommendations | email to a friend
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