Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alaska Science Forum: In Hawaii, hints of a giant Alaska tsunami
Clues from a crater-like sinkhole on the island of Kauai point back to a giant wave that came from Alaska at about the time European explorers were pushing west, seeing the Mississippi River for the first time. The Makauwahi Sinkhole on the southeast shore of Kauai holds the mysterious equivalent of about nine shipping containers full of rocks, corals and shells from the Pacific Ocean. For the material to breach t...
Jan 02, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 50 50 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: High-and-dry log points to great Alaska tsunamis
As Gary Carver stepped through the grasses of a treeless Alaska island with an archaeologist friend, he spotted a bleached driftwood log. The log rested on sand about a half mile from the beach and 50 feet above sea level. Carver, on the island searching out Aleutian mummies for a Discovery Channel program, is an expert on tsunamis. He suspected that only a giant wave could have delivered a 30-foot log that high o...
Dec 24, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 42 42 recommendations | email to a friend
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Earth’s coldest spot is not in Alaska
SAN FRANCISCO — Last July, while we Alaskans enjoyed another warm day, the surface temperature dropped to minus 135.3 degrees Fahrenheit in an icy trough on a south-facing ridge in western Antarctica. According to the man who noticed the temperature, Ted Scambos at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo., that and another day during Antarctica’s polar night are the coldest surface temperatures yet ...
Dec 18, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Grinding fish heads for the goodness within
NIKISKI — In a chilly building across Cook Inlet from the white pyramid of Mount Redoubt rest a few dozen plastic-lined cardboard totes filled to the brim with an amber liquid. Each chest-high cube holds about a ton of fish oil extracted this summer from the heads of salmon. It’s a product that would have been lost to the Kenai River if Pat Simpson had not recovered it. Simpson, 49, is a fisherman-turned-entrepren...
Dec 11, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 43 43 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Biologist creates legacy at village goose camp
When Craig Ely thumbed through his collection of photos of Alaska Native kids and biologists gathered in front of an old church, he knew he had to make a yearbook. Not for himself, though he would savor the memories, but for all the kids who had helped him do science since the 1980s. The U.S. Geological Survey biologist has executed on that project, working with talented colleagues to create a book with pictures o...
Dec 04, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 45 45 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: By the light of the moon
Laura Prugh knew she shouldn’t bother trying to trap kangaroo rats in the California desert on nights when the moon was shining. Professors had told her that small mammals make themselves scarce under the light of the moon, lest they become a meal for a predator that spotted them. But Prugh had no choice. She had so many study plots at Carrizo Plain National Monument she needed to set out her traps every night she...
Nov 27, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 47 47 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Visiting bats and the hot maggots of autumn
After she read a column on Alaska bats, Pat Holloway of Fairbanks sent me a photo of a little brown bat that made it into her house this summer. It surprised her, as bats tend to do when they appear in your home. After she stopped shrieking and ushered the bat out through an open screen, she searched her house the point of entry. In her loft, Holloway saw a screen with a crack at its corner no wider than a pencil....
Nov 13, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 61 61 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Alaskans’ vitamin D production slows with the season
Interested people are needed to participate in a one-year study to assess the effects of long dark winters on the vitamin D and calcium levels of Fairbanks residents. So began a recruitment poster Meredith Tallas created more than 25 years ago. Now living in California, in 1983 Tallas was a University of Alaska Fairbanks student who wanted to study how levels of a vitamin related to sun exposure fluctuated in peop...
Nov 06, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 65 65 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Biologist sees value in unchanged landscape
George Schaller has studied gorillas in Rwanda, lions on the Serengeti, pandas in China, antelope in Tibet, and many other animals in wild places around the planet, but he thinks the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is unique among them. He visited there in 2006 for the first time in half a century. “On the Sheenjek (River), we climbed the same cliff I climbed in 1956, and looking out there was no difference — no r...
Oct 30, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 62 62 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Scientists endure nights on mountaintop perch
Leaning against her Thermarest pad in a helicopter coated with ice, Taryn Lopez imagined herself as the little girl rocking to sleep in her parent’s boat. Just before she drifted off on that early September night, the volcano researcher wondered if the climbing ropes would hold the Jet Ranger to the wind-pounded volcano on the spine of the Alaska Peninsula. “We weren’t sure if we’d wake up the next morning having ...
Oct 23, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 51 51 recommendations | email to a friend
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