Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Head
Nasquq - Head Nasquqa allrani anq’rtaartuq. - My head sometimes hurts. Covering the head is an important part of staying warm in cold, wet, or windy conditions, like those found on Kodiak. Alutiiq people designed a great variety of hats to protect their heads and retain heat. Unlike the skin clothing of far northern Alaska, Alutiiq parkas did not include a hood. People wore long robes with a short, loose-fitting, ...
Jan 03, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Ice Skate
Kungkiq; Kankiiq - Ice Skate Cuumi kungkirtaallianga unuk nangpiarluku iraluwakan. - Before, I used to ice skate all night sometimes when the moon was out. By December, many of Kodiak’s small ponds frozen strong enough to support ice skaters. Alutiiq Elders recall the joy of skating. As youths, many had homemade ice skates made from evaporated milk cans. Flatten the cans, tie them to your shoes, and away you go, s...
Dec 27, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Russian
Kasaakaq — Russian Cuumi Kasaakat Sun’ami amlerta’umallriit. — Before in Kodiak there were (reportedly) a lot of Russians. The Russian era in Alaska began in the early 18th century when explorers and traders sailed east from Siberia in search of new lands and resources. In addition to a wealth of sea mammals, fish, and birds, Russian colonists found Native people: a source of skilled labor for harvesting this boun...
Dec 20, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Hunter
Pisurta - Hunter Taugna suk pisurta. - This person is a hunter. The Alutiiq word pisurta translates literally as “one who hunts.” Hunting has always been essential to life on Kodiak, a way to procure not only food but many of the raw materials of daily living: animal skins for clothing and boat coverings, gut for waterproof rain gear and containers, bone and antler for tools, and whiskers, claws, teeth, and hair f...
Dec 13, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Shuyak Island
Suu’aq; Suyaraq - Shuyak Island Anchorage-mek tai’akamta plane-gun Suu’aq tang’rtaarpet. - When we come from Anchorage by plane, we can see Shuyak Island. Shuyak Island, the seventh-largest of the Kodiak islands, covers sixty-nine square miles at the northern end of the archipelago. Just twelve miles long and eleven miles wide, this small island features a lush blanket of spruce forest and hundreds of small lakes....
Dec 06, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Cip’ausngasqaq
Cip’ausngasqaq - Show Off; Smart Aleck Awaqutan cip’ausngauq. - Your son is a smart aleck. In the Alutiiq language, the word cip’ausngasqaq translates literally as a “know it all” or a “smart aleck,” and people use the term to refer to someone who thinks of himself as a big shot. Among Alutiiqs, behaving like a big shot can be dangerous. Boasting is not only bad manners, it can poison your luck. A boastful hunter ...
Nov 29, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Kettle
Cainiik - Kettle Cainiik kallaqsiituq. - The kettle didn’t boil yet. Drinking tea, a favorite pastime in Alutiiq households, has ancient roots. Alutiiqs have long steeped medicinal plants in hot water to create healing infusions. In the nineteenth century, Alutiiqs began drinking black tea obtained in trade from Russian colonists. With European tea came a variety of teapots, cups, saucers, and samovars. Samovars a...
Nov 22, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Cold
Pat’snarluni - Cold Uksumi pat’snartaartuq. - It is always cold in the winter. The Kodiak Archipelago lies in a maritime environment. Despite the region’s northern latitude, encircling ocean waters and prevailing weather keep air temperatures mild by Alaska standards. At sea level, Kodiak’s temperatures typically range from 40° to 60° Fahrenheit (4.4°–15.6° Celsius) in summer and hover around freezing (32° Fahrenh...
Nov 15, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Yuwaluni
Niuwaluni; Yuwaluni - Talk (continuously) Alutiit’stun niuwaneq pingaktaaqa. - I like to talk the Alutiiq language. The Alutiiq language, the indigenous language of the Kodiak Archipelago, is known as Sugt’stun, which literally means “to speak like a person.” Although there are just a few handfuls of fluent Sugt’stun speakers in the Kodiak region today, Alutiiqs know that in any language, words can impact the worl...
Nov 08, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Arctic Entry
Siinaq - Kellidoor; Arctic Entry Cuumi, siinami taangapet puckaani et’aallriit. - Before, in the kellidor we kept our water in barrels. In northern climates where people rely on heavy clothing, stored foods, and sophisticated technologies for survival, storing one’s supplies is always a concern. Northern peoples manage this problem by creating special storage areas in their homes. In addition to piling supplies al...
Nov 01, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend
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