Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Tree pitch
Angeq : Tree pitch Angermek aturtaakait nept’staliyakameng. : They used pitch to make glue. Alutiiq people used every part of the spruce tree, from its wood and roots to its needles and sticky pitch. When the bark of a spruce is ripped or cut, sap collects at the site of the injury. Alutiiqs recognize two different types of pitch, soft and hard, that form in a variety of colors: clear, white, yellow, pink, and eve...
Apr 12, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Port Hobron
Masriluq : Port Hobron Masrilumi arwarsurtaallriit. : They used to hunt whales at Port Hobron. Today the derelict hull of a wooden ship, rusting tanks, and building remnants are all that remain of the whaling station at Port Hobron. Nestled against the shore of Port Hobron Bay, a narrow fjord on the northern coast of Sitkalidak Island, the now-abandoned station was an active commercial enterprise run by the Alaska...
Apr 05, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Easter
Paas’kaaq : Easter Ugnerkami Paas’kaartaartukut. : We have Easter in the spring. Orthodox Easter is a central holiday in Alutiiq communities. Like Russian Christmas, it combines cultural traditions. Forty days of Lent precede Easter, creating a period of reflection and sacrifice. The Alutiiq faithful live simply, eating fish and vegetables, as no animal products are allowed. This period of fasting mirrors spring i...
Mar 29, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: March 22
Kuicaaq : Waterfall Olga Bay-mi kuicaaq et’uq egkum akiani. : In Olga Bay there is a waterfall across from Egkuq. Kodiak’s rugged topography and its wet weather combine to create many small waterfalls. Heavy rains saturate the ground, providing runoff for streams that spill down mountainsides and plummet over cliffs. Some waterfalls are seasonal, fed by spring rains and melting snow, while others drain steep slope...
Mar 22, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: March 15
Unigkuaq : Legend Unigkuarsngutaartut. : They always like to tell legends. In the English language, the word “story” is a broad term that can be used to describe many different types of tales, from fairy tales to newspaper articles. Not so in the Alutiiq language, where there are distinct terms for story and legend. In the Alutiiq world, a story — quliyanguaq — is a tale that recounts historical events. An Alutiiq...
Mar 15, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Lent
Pustaaq : Lent Pustaartaartut Paas’karpailata. : They always have Lent before Easter. In Alutiiq communities, the Lenten season covers the forty days preceding Orthodox Easter. The two or three weeks before Lent are often a time of celebration, in preparation for the fasting and quiet lifestyle expected in the days leading up to Easter. Before Lent, Alutiiqs eat lots of good food, hold dances, and play games that ...
Mar 08, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Golden-crowned sparrow
Ikauwiitii(q); Ikuwitii(q); Iiyapawawi’i : Golden-crowned sparrow
 Ikauwitiit nitnirtaartut. : Golden-crowned sparrows always sound beautiful. 
Sparrows are among the best-known birds in North America. There are many species and subspecies of sparrows, particularly west of the Rockies. Eleven species of these small, shy songbirds frequent Alaska, summering in brushy habitats from the coastal meadows of western Ala...
Mar 01, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Word of the Week: Feb. 22
Tegleq: Steal
 Ilait teglengartaartut.: Some people like to steal. Stealing was not a common problem in classical Alutiiq society. Although powerful people organized raiding parties to ransack other villages for food, goods, and even slaves, theft within a community was rare. As in many northern societies where families shared their possessions and assisted those in need, there was little need to steal. Alutiiq pe...
Feb 22, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Feb. 15
Wainiik : Steam Bath Switch Taaringa wainiimek. : Switch me with the steam batch switch. Switching is a common practice in Alutiiq steam baths. In the soothing, wet heat, people slap themselves with flexible branches to promote good health. This practice improves circulation, relieves aches and pains and can be used to treat illness and prepare a pregnant woman for delivery. Pneumonia, difficulty urinating, and cr...
Feb 15, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Feb. 8
Kasaakaruaq : Creole Kasaakaruat Sun’ami amlertut. : There are a lot of part-Russians in Kodiak. The term Creole comes from the Spanish word criollo – meaning native to the place. In nineteenth century Kodiak, Russian entrepreneurs used this term for individuals of both Russian and Native ancestry, an increasingly large and segregated part of Kodiak’s population. Descent was not the only defining characteristic of...
Feb 08, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
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