Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alaska Science Forum: Southeast residents show savvy after large earthquake
Around midnight on Jan. 4, Kathleen Brandt felt an earthquake at her home in Sitka. As framed pictures trembled and fell from the walls, she started counting. “I got to 22 seconds before the shaking stopped,” Brandt said. The 45-year resident of this historic Southeast community told her earthquake story following a recent community presentation there by Natalia Ruppert. Ruppert is a seismologist with the Geophysi...
Feb 20, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Amazing Nature: Kodiak students compete and learn about oceans in statewide contest
On, Sunday night, five tired Kodiak High School students and their two coaches returned home after a long and strenuous, fun and educational weekend. The annual statewide Tsunami Bowl competition in Seward, organized by the University of Alaska is a venue for high school teams to show off and expand their knowledge of the ocean. Friday and Saturday morning were given to team presentations about teams’ respective r...
Feb 15, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Seismologist visits Southeast in wake of large earthquake
CRAIG — In this cozy Southeast Alaska community that smells of red cedar chips used to power a boiler that heats both the school and the pool, seismologist Natalia Ruppert responded to an hour of questions from more than 150 people who gathered in the auditorium of the Craig High School. The residents of Craig and the outlying areas, many of them wearing Xtratufs and flannel shirts on a rainy/snowy evening, had ex...
Feb 13, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Bison Bob a big discovery on the North Slope
As she scraped cold dirt from the remains of an extinct bison, Pam Groves wrinkled her nose at a rotten-egg smell wafting from gristle that still clung to the animal’s bones. She lifted her head to scan the horizon, wary of bears that might be attracted to the flesh of a creature that gasped its last breath 40,000 years ago. In the type of discovery they have dreamed about for years, Groves and Dan Mann, both rese...
Jan 30, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: White River ash made its way across the globe
The White River Ash, blasted from giant eruptions somewhere in today’s Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, drifted as far away as Ireland and Germany, said experts who attended the December 2012 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, held in San Francisco. Ash from the White River eruptions, possibly from 15,638-foot Mount Churchill or at least close to it, left an easy-to-see mark on eastern Alaska and northwe...
Jan 23, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Bowheads rise, Barrow sinks, fire scars the tundra
From my notebook, here’s more northern news presented at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, a five-day gathering of more than 20,000 scientists held in early December 2012 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco: Bowhead whales counted from a sea-ice perch north of Barrow are “doing beautifully,” according to Craig George with the North Slope Borough. Since 1978, George has counted bowhead whales f...
Jan 09, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Alaska forests in transition
In almost every patch of boreal forest in Interior Alaska that Glenn Juday has studied since the 1980s, at least one quarter of the aspen, white spruce and birch trees are dead. “These are mature forest stands that were established 120 to 200 years ago,” said Juday, a professor of forest ecology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences. “Big holes have appeared i...
Jan 04, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Climate change and the people of the Mesa
Alaska was once the setting for an environmental shift so dramatic it forced people to evacuate the entire North Slope, according to Michael Kunz, an archaeologist with the Bureau of Land Management. About 10,000 years ago, a group of hunting people lived on the North Slope, the swath of mostly treeless tundra that extends north from the Brooks Range to the sea. These people, known as Paleoindians, used a chunky r...
Dec 26, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Dramatic report card for the Arctic in 2012
SAN FRANCISCO — Northern sea ice is at its lowest summer coverage since we’ve been able to see it from satellites. Greenland experienced its warmest summer in 170 years. Eight of 10 permafrost-monitoring sites in northern Alaska recorded their highest temperatures; the other two tied record highs. 2012 was a year of “astounding” change for much of the planet north of the Arctic Circle, said four experts at a press...
Dec 19, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Forty years of change on top of the world
SAN FRANCISCO — From a lecture hall within a land of warm breezes and flowering December plants comes a story of a creature 2,600 miles north, where the sun will not rise for another 50 days. At the 2012 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, biologist George Divoky had 15 minutes to present his lifetime of work with a bird that adapted to year-round life in the Arctic during the last ice age. Divoky led ...
Dec 12, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend
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