Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Science
 
Alaska Science Forum: After a lifetime of study, aurora still a mystery
Sometimes, after idling in the sky for hours as a greenish glow, the aurora catches fire, erupting toward the magnetic north pole in magnificent chaos that can last for three hours. “Substorms,” as space physicists call them, can happen two or three times each night. The man who came up with that name half a century ago has, with a former student he once mentored, come up with a new theory on the location of heave...
Mar 13, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Southwest Alaska challenging for travel, shelter
BETHEL — Outside the Fly By Café, the ravens are flying backwards. At least they appear to be, as a powerful wind suspends them in time and space. A brewing ground blizzard in this Southwest Alaska hub is making it difficult for Jack Hébert to get to Atmautluak, a village of less than 300 people here on the flats of the Kuskokwim River Delta. Hébert, president and founder of the Cold Climate Housing Research Cente...
Mar 06, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Alaska bucks the global temperature trend
This just in: 2012 was the coldest year of the new century in Fairbanks, and the second-coldest here in the last 40 years. Fairbanks isn’t the only chilly place in Alaska. Average temperatures at 19 of 20 long-term National Weather Service stations displayed a cooling trend from 2000 to 2010, according a recent study written up by Gerd Wendler, Blake Moore and Lian Chen of the Alaska Climate Research Center. The r...
Feb 27, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Southeast residents show savvy after large earthquake
Around midnight on Jan. 4, Kathleen Brandt felt an earthquake at her home in Sitka. As framed pictures trembled and fell from the walls, she started counting. “I got to 22 seconds before the shaking stopped,” Brandt said. The 45-year resident of this historic Southeast community told her earthquake story following a recent community presentation there by Natalia Ruppert. Ruppert is a seismologist with the Geophysi...
Feb 20, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Amazing Nature: Kodiak students compete and learn about oceans in statewide contest
On, Sunday night, five tired Kodiak High School students and their two coaches returned home after a long and strenuous, fun and educational weekend. The annual statewide Tsunami Bowl competition in Seward, organized by the University of Alaska is a venue for high school teams to show off and expand their knowledge of the ocean. Friday and Saturday morning were given to team presentations about teams’ respective r...
Feb 15, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Seismologist visits Southeast in wake of large earthquake
CRAIG — In this cozy Southeast Alaska community that smells of red cedar chips used to power a boiler that heats both the school and the pool, seismologist Natalia Ruppert responded to an hour of questions from more than 150 people who gathered in the auditorium of the Craig High School. The residents of Craig and the outlying areas, many of them wearing Xtratufs and flannel shirts on a rainy/snowy evening, had ex...
Feb 13, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Bison Bob a big discovery on the North Slope
As she scraped cold dirt from the remains of an extinct bison, Pam Groves wrinkled her nose at a rotten-egg smell wafting from gristle that still clung to the animal’s bones. She lifted her head to scan the horizon, wary of bears that might be attracted to the flesh of a creature that gasped its last breath 40,000 years ago. In the type of discovery they have dreamed about for years, Groves and Dan Mann, both rese...
Jan 30, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: White River ash made its way across the globe
The White River Ash, blasted from giant eruptions somewhere in today’s Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, drifted as far away as Ireland and Germany, said experts who attended the December 2012 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, held in San Francisco. Ash from the White River eruptions, possibly from 15,638-foot Mount Churchill or at least close to it, left an easy-to-see mark on eastern Alaska and northwe...
Jan 23, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Bowheads rise, Barrow sinks, fire scars the tundra
From my notebook, here’s more northern news presented at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, a five-day gathering of more than 20,000 scientists held in early December 2012 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco: Bowhead whales counted from a sea-ice perch north of Barrow are “doing beautifully,” according to Craig George with the North Slope Borough. Since 1978, George has counted bowhead whales f...
Jan 09, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alaska Science Forum: Alaska forests in transition
In almost every patch of boreal forest in Interior Alaska that Glenn Juday has studied since the 1980s, at least one quarter of the aspen, white spruce and birch trees are dead. “These are mature forest stands that were established 120 to 200 years ago,” said Juday, a professor of forest ecology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences. “Big holes have appeared i...
Jan 04, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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