Kodiak Daily Mirror - Alutiiq Museum s fall lectures begin
  
Alutiiq Museum’s fall lectures begin
by Julie Herrmann
Aug 25, 2014 | 73 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The archeological team at Old Harbor uncovers the red ochre floor of a 6,000-year-old house site that will soon be covered by construction of the new Old Harbor airport.
(Patrick Saltonstall photo)
The archeological team at Old Harbor uncovers the red ochre floor of a 6,000-year-old house site that will soon be covered by construction of the new Old Harbor airport. (Patrick Saltonstall photo)
slideshow
Danielle Ringer stands in a midden, or garbage pit, excavation at the site of the new Old Harbor runway.
(Patrick Saltonstall photo)
Danielle Ringer stands in a midden, or garbage pit, excavation at the site of the new Old Harbor runway. (Patrick Saltonstall photo)
slideshow
Alutiiq Museum archaeologist Patrick Saltonstall holds a 500-year-old bone toggle harpoon Tuesday, July 2, 2013 in the museum's laboratory. When used, the harpoon would have been paired with a long wooden shaft and a string threaded through the hole just below the barbed tip. After striking an animal — likely a seal — the harpoon tip would remain stuck, trailing a floating bladder and allowing hunters to close with and kill the animal.
(James Brooks photo)
Alutiiq Museum archaeologist Patrick Saltonstall holds a 500-year-old bone toggle harpoon Tuesday, July 2, 2013 in the museum's laboratory. When used, the harpoon would have been paired with a long wooden shaft and a string threaded through the hole just below the barbed tip. After striking an animal — likely a seal — the harpoon tip would remain stuck, trailing a floating bladder and allowing hunters to close with and kill the animal. (James Brooks photo)
slideshow
Catherine West and Samantha Dunning examine the profile of a dig site in Old Harbor.
(Patrick Saltonstall photo)
Catherine West and Samantha Dunning examine the profile of a dig site in Old Harbor. (Patrick Saltonstall photo)
slideshow
On Tuesday, July 2, 2013 Alutiiq Museum archaeologist Patrick Saltonstall holds a 500-year-old thimble-sized toy oil lamp found during a dig in Old Harbor.
(James Brooks photo)
On Tuesday, July 2, 2013 Alutiiq Museum archaeologist Patrick Saltonstall holds a 500-year-old thimble-sized toy oil lamp found during a dig in Old Harbor. (James Brooks photo)
slideshow
The Alutiiq Museum’s fall lecture series begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday night with “Angyaq: Art of the Alutiiq Open Boat,” a talk by former museum director Sven Haakanson.

“He’ll be talking about traditional boating,” Alutiiq museum communications director Brian Fraley said.

Haakanson, a 2007 MacArthurt Foundation “genius grant” award winner, left the museum just over a year ago.

Of the following museum lectures, two will address the endangered Alutiiq language.

“That’s been a strong part of our mission right now, is revitalization of the language, getting more people to learn it,” Fraley said.

Daria Safronova-Simenoff will give a presentation titled “Russian Alutiiq Cyrillic Archival Treasures” on Oct. 16.

“She’ll be showing a lot of samples of Alutiiq translations, basically the Russians trying to put Alutiiq words on paper because it was a completely oral language,” Fraley said. “That kind of draws into what we’re doing today, because our version of written Alutiiq is only I think about 30 years old, so this has been a really recent endeavor.”

Another lecture will focus on archaeology. Museum curator Patrick Saltonstall will speak about excavating in Old Harbor at the site of the runway expansion. There are three archaeological sites in that area, and state and federal laws require them to be studied before construction.

“Over five weeks, a team of museum researchers and Old Harbor students peeled back the layers of three small sites. In each they revealed ancient buildings,” Fraley said. “He’ll be talking about that and showing slides of the dig and what we’ve found.”

The final lecture on Oct. 30 will include the unveiling of a caribou parka replica that several women have been working on for over a year and a half.

Susan Malutin, Cathy Cordery, Marya Halvorsen, Teri Schneider and Hanna Sholl will talk about the process and show slides from throughout the work. The project included a trip to Helsinki, Finland, to study an original example and teaching skin-sewing classes to people who helped sew the reproduction.

After the lecture, the parka will go on display in the museum’s main gallery.

Other lectures will be about Alutiiq masks, storytelling, fisheries, woodcarving and botanical traditions.

“There’s something for everyone,” Fraley said.

Each lecture is expected to last about an hour.

Except for the first one, the lectures will take place Thursdays at 7 p.m. at the Alutiiq Museum.

Contact Julie Herrmann at jherrmann@kodiakdailymirror.com.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
The Kodiak Daily Mirror encourages a lively exchange of ideas regarding topics in the news. Users are solely responsible for the content. Please keep it clean, respect others and use the 'report abuse' link when necessary. Read our full user's agreement.
Search Our Marketplace
or Search by category